Author Archives: borderslynn

About borderslynn

Retired, living in the Scottish Borders after living most of my life in cities in England. I can now indulge my interest in all aspects of living close to nature in a wild landscape. I live on what was once the Iapetus Ocean which took millions of years to travel from the Southern Hemisphere to here in the Northern Hemisphere. That set me thinking and questioning and seeking answers. In 1998 I co-wrote Millennium Countdown (US)/ A Business Guide to the Year 2000 (UK) see https://www.abebooks.co.uk/products/isbn/9780749427917

B for Bamboo. When is Bamboo clothing not Bamboo? When it is Viscose.

I have quoted Owlcation for some of the following details. China and India are the main sources of this grass, which can grow tall, looking like trees in a forest. It does not attract pests, so does not require treatment … Continue reading

Posted in anthropocene | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A for Acrylonitrile and a move to Circular Fashion

Due to raised awareness of brutality to animals in order to provide us with clothing, we have sought alternatives. Vegans demand no animals be used to make Fashion Industry products, but non-vegans, whilst enjoying eating meat, have also become aware … Continue reading

Posted in anthropocene | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fast Fashion Fuelling Extinction

A few years back I wrote about climate and how the lives of the Inuit had to change as a result. They have been major users of animal skins since they first arrived after generations of travel from Africa, as … Continue reading

Posted in anthropocene | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cotton and Wool Blending

Like much of our knowledge and language, the word ‘cotton’ comes from Arabic ‘quton’. As with wool and silk, so cotton is a natural fabric and is comfortable to the most sensitive skin. It is soft yet strong; is absorbent; … Continue reading

Posted in anthropocene | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wool

Killing a sheep and cutting off its skin to provide clothing is obviously a skill humans have been honing for thousands of years, since we skinned many animals to clothe us, and ate the meat, used the bones to create … Continue reading

Posted in anthropocene | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Egyptian Cotton, Linen and Bleach

5000 years ago the Egyptians mastered the art of bleaching. White fabric was a premium choice and one might say they had a compulsive obsession to wash for personal hygiene and wear clean clothes, and that is no bad thing. … Continue reading

Posted in anthropocene | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Battle Against Nature for Cotton

Using modern techniques, it has been possible to identify the earliest cotton in a copper bead within a grave in Mehrgarh. It is thought the first cotton was grown and utilised by early farmers in this region of what is … Continue reading

Posted in anthropocene | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Clothing our nakedness.

Any other form of life is perfectly fitted to its environment. We were probably at our best when our bodies were covered in fur and we lived in jungle terrain. Since we lost our fur, we have had to clothe … Continue reading

Posted in anthropocene | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

C02 and Agricultural Practices

Since Neolithic times, when humans became farmers, we have sought ways to change land use to fit our needs. We have terraced hillsides to grow food, we have developed irrigation and switched routes of rivers to benefit land where water … Continue reading

Posted in anthropocene | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Living Things and the Carbon Dilemma

Since Joseph Black discovered carbon dioxide and chemists began to understand its importance, we have harnessed it for many advantageous applications which assist humans in their endeavours. The medical world has grown thanks to our understanding of how living things … Continue reading

Posted in anthropocene | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment